Rudrani Tidke
Cummins College of Engineering for Women (CCEW), Pune
Rudrani Tidke has created this Calculator and 10+ more calculators!
Kethavath Srinath
Osmania University (OU), Hyderabad
Kethavath Srinath has verified this Calculator and 200+ more calculators!

11 Other formulas that you can solve using the same Inputs

Distance from center to a light source for destructive interference in YDSE
Distance from center to the light source=((2*Number-1)*Wavelength*Distance between slits and screen)/(2*Distance between two coherent sources) GO
Distance from center to a light source for constructive interference in YDSE
Distance from center to the light source=(Number*Wavelength*Distance between slits and screen)/Distance between two coherent sources GO
Fringe Width
Fringe Width=(Wavelength*Distance between slits and screen)/Distance between two coherent sources GO
Optical path difference when fringe width is given
Optical path difference=(Refractive Index-1)*Thickness*Fringe Width/Wavelength GO
Distance from center to a light source for destructive interference in YDSE
Distance from center to the light source=(2*Number+1)*Wavelength/2 GO
Phase Difference
Phase Difference=(2*pi*Path Difference)/Wavelength GO
Thin-film destructive interference in reflected light
Destructive Interference=Number*Wavelength GO
Path difference for minima in Young’s double-slit experiment
Path Difference=(2*Number-1)*Wavelength/2 GO
Path difference for minima in Young’s double-slit experiment
Path Difference=(2*Number+1)*Wavelength/2 GO
Path difference of two progressive wave
Path Difference=(2*pi)/Wavelength GO
Path difference in YDSE when λ is given
Path Difference=Number*Wavelength GO

1 Other formulas that calculate the same Output

Photon’s Momentum when Energy is Given
Photon's Momentum=Photon Energy/[c] GO

Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given Formula

Photon's Momentum=[hP]*Wavelength
More formulas
Photon’s Momentum when Energy is Given GO
Stopping Potential GO
Energy in nth Bohr’s Orbit GO
Quantization of the Angular Momentum GO
Moseley’s Law GO
Beta Parameter Of A Transistor Using Base Current GO
Alpha Parameter Of A Transistor Using Beta GO
collector current Of A Transistor Using alpha GO
Collector current Of A Transistor Using Beta GO
emitter current Of A Transistor Using alpha GO
Base current Of A Transistor Using Beta GO

Why Photon have momentum when they do not have mass?

The quantum of EM (Electro-Magnetic) radiation considers a photon has properties analogous to those of particles one can see, such as grains of sand. A photon interacts as a unit in collisions or when absorbed, rather than as an extensive wave. Massive quanta, like electrons, also act like macroscopic particles, because they are the smallest units of matter. Particles carry momentum as well as energy. Despite photons having no mass, there has long been evidence that EM radiation carries momentum. (Maxwell and others who studied EM waves predicted that they would carry momentum.) It is now a well-established fact that photons do have momentum. In fact, photon momentum is suggested by the photoelectric effect, where photons knock electrons out of a substance.

What is the experimental evidence for Photon Momentum?

Some of the earliest direct experimental evidence of this came from scattering of x-ray photons by electrons in substances, named Compton scattering after the American physicist Arthur H. Compton (1892–1962). Compton observed that x rays scattered from materials had a decreased energy and correctly analyzed this as being due to the scattering of photons from electrons. This phenomenon could be handled as a collision between two particles—a photon and an electron at rest in the material. Energy and momentum are conserved in the collision. He won a Nobel Prize in 1929 for the discovery of this scattering, now called the Compton effect, because it helped prove that photon momentum is given by above equation.

How to Calculate Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given?

Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given calculator uses Photon's Momentum=[hP]*Wavelength to calculate the Photon's Momentum, The Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given formula is defined as the quantity of motion that an photon has to knock electrons out of a substance. Photon's Momentum and is denoted by p symbol.

How to calculate Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given using this online calculator? To use this online calculator for Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given, enter Wavelength (λ) and hit the calculate button. Here is how the Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given calculation can be explained with given input values -> 1.325E-33 = [hP]*2.

FAQ

What is Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given?
The Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given formula is defined as the quantity of motion that an photon has to knock electrons out of a substance and is represented as p=[hP]*λ or Photon's Momentum=[hP]*Wavelength. Wavelength is the distance between identical points (adjacent crests) in the adjacent cycles of a waveform signal propagated in space or along a wire.
How to calculate Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given?
The Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given formula is defined as the quantity of motion that an photon has to knock electrons out of a substance is calculated using Photon's Momentum=[hP]*Wavelength. To calculate Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given, you need Wavelength (λ). With our tool, you need to enter the respective value for Wavelength and hit the calculate button. You can also select the units (if any) for Input(s) and the Output as well.
How many ways are there to calculate Photon's Momentum?
In this formula, Photon's Momentum uses Wavelength. We can use 1 other way(s) to calculate the same, which is/are as follows -
  • Photon's Momentum=Photon Energy/[c]
Share Image
Let Others Know
Facebook
Twitter
Reddit
LinkedIn
Email
WhatsApp
Copied!