Maiarutselvan V
PSG College of Technology (PSGCT), Coimbatore
Maiarutselvan V has created this Calculator and 300+ more calculators!
Shikha Maurya
Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Bombay
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11 Other formulas that you can solve using the same Inputs

Surface Area of a Rectangular Prism
Surface Area=2*(Length*Width+Length*Height+Width*Height) GO
Pressure when density and height are given
Pressure=Density*Acceleration Due To Gravity*Height GO
Magnetic Flux
Magnetic Flux=Magnetic Field*Length*Breadth*cos(θ) GO
Molar Volume
Molar Volume=(Atomic Weight*Molar Mass)/Density GO
Area of a Rectangle when length and diagonal are given
Area=Length*(sqrt((Diagonal)^2-(Length)^2)) GO
Diagonal of a Rectangle when length and breadth are given
Diagonal=sqrt(Length^2+Breadth^2) GO
Strain
Strain=Change In Length/Length GO
Surface Tension
Surface Tension=Force/Length GO
Perimeter of a rectangle when length and width are given
Perimeter=2*Length+2*Width GO
Volume of a Rectangular Prism
Volume=Width*Height*Length GO
Area of a Rectangle when length and breadth are given
Area=Length*Breadth GO

11 Other formulas that calculate the same Output

Circle Diameter when Maximum Permissible Eccentricity for Spiral Columns is Given
Diameter =(Maximum permissible eccentricity-0.14*Overall depth of column)/(0.43*Area ratio of cross sectional area to gross area*Force ratio of strengths of reinforcements) GO
Diameter of Roller or Rocker for milled surface when Allowable Stress is Given for d < 635 mm
Diameter =33.33*Allowable Bearing Stresses on Pins/(yield strength of steel-13) GO
Circle Diameter when Axial Load for Spiral Columns is Given
Diameter =moment/(0.12*Total area*Yield strength of reinforcing steel) GO
Diameter bisecting chords of slope m to the parabola y2 = 4ax
Diameter =(2*x coordinate of focus of parabola)/Slope of Line GO
Diameter of a Rod Circular Fin when area of cross-section is Given
Diameter =sqrt((Cross sectional area*4)/pi) GO
Diameter of a circle when circumference is given
Diameter =Circumference of Circle/pi GO
Diameter of a circle when area is given
Diameter =2*sqrt(Area of Circle/pi) GO
Diameter of a Nugget
Diameter =6*(Thickness)^1/2 GO
Diameter of a circular cylinder of maximum convex surface area in a given circular cone
Diameter =Radius of cone GO
Diameter of a circle when radius is given
Diameter =2*Radius GO
Diameter of Sphere
Diameter =2*Radius GO

Diameter of capillary tube Formula

Diameter =((viscosity of fluid*128*Discharge*Length)/(pi*Density*[g]*difference in pressure head))^(1/4)
d=(( μ*128*Q*l)/(pi*ρ*[g]*h))^(1/4)
More formulas
Difference of pressure for viscous or laminar flow GO
Diameter of pipe for difference in pressure in viscous flow GO
Length of pipe for difference of pressure in viscous flow GO
Velocity at any radius, radius of pipe, and maximum velocity GO
Maximum velocity at any radius with a velocity, and radius of pipe GO
Radius of pipe from maximum velocity and velocity at any radius GO
Loss of pressure head for viscous flow through circular pipe GO
Diameter of pipe for loss of pressure head in viscous flow GO
Length of pipe for loss of pressure head in viscous flow GO
Difference of pressure for viscous flow between two parallel plates GO
Length for difference of pressure in viscous flow between two parallel plates GO
Loss of pressure head for viscous flow between two parallel plates GO
Length for pressure head loss in viscous flow between two parallel plates GO
Shear stress in the fluid or oil of journal bearing GO
Thickness of oil film for speed and diameter of shaft in journal bearing GO
Diameter of shaft for speed and shear stress of fluid in journal bearing GO
Shear force or viscous resistance in journal bearing GO
Thickness of oil film for shear force in journal bearing GO
Speed of rotation for shear force in journal bearing GO
Torque required to overcome the shear force in journal bearing GO
Shear force for torque and diameter of shaft in journal bearing GO
Power absorbed in overcoming viscous resistance in journal bearing GO
Torque required considering power absorbed in journal bearing GO
Rotational speed considering power absorbed and torque in journal bearing GO
Torque required to overcome viscous resistance in foot-step bearing GO
Radius of shaft for torque required in foot-step bearing GO
Rotational speed for torque required in foot-step bearing GO
Thickness of oil film for torque required in foot-step bearing GO
Power absorbed in foot-step bearing GO
Torque required to overcome viscous resistance in collar bearing GO
External or outer radius of collar for total torque GO
Internal or inner radius of collar for total torque GO
Rotational speed for torque required in collar bearing GO
Power absorbed in collar bearing GO
Loss of head due to friction GO
Diameter of pipe for head loss due to friction in viscous flow GO
Length of pipe for head loss due to friction in viscous flow GO
Viscosity of fluid or oil for movement of piston in dash-pot GO
Velocity of piston or body for movement of piston in dash-pot GO
Viscosity of fluid or oil for capillary tube method GO
Discharge in capillary tube method GO
Length of tube in capillary tube method GO
Drag force in falling sphere resistance method GO
Velocity of sphere in falling sphere resistance method GO
Diameter of sphere in falling sphere resistance method GO
Viscosity of fluid or oil in falling sphere resistance method GO
Buoyant force in falling sphere resistance method GO
Density of fluid in falling sphere resistance method GO
Viscosity of fluid or oil in rotating cylinder method GO
Total torque measured by strain in rotating cylinder method GO
Angular speed of outer cylinder in rotating cylinder method GO

How does viscosity affect capillary action?

Capillary action is the phenomenon in which liquids rise up into a narrow tube called a capillary. The viscosity of a liquid is its resistance to flow. Liquids that have strong intermolecular forces tend to have high viscosities.

Why does liquid rise in capillary tube?

Capillarity is the result of surface, or interfacial, forces. The rise of water in a thin tube inserted in water is caused by forces of attraction between the molecules of water and the glass walls and among the molecules of water themselves.

How to Calculate Diameter of capillary tube?

Diameter of capillary tube calculator uses Diameter =((viscosity of fluid*128*Discharge*Length)/(pi*Density*[g]*difference in pressure head))^(1/4) to calculate the Diameter , The Diameter of capillary tube formula is known while considering the density of oil or fluid, difference in pressure head for a length 'L', the viscosity of fluid or oil, and the discharge. . Diameter and is denoted by d symbol.

How to calculate Diameter of capillary tube using this online calculator? To use this online calculator for Diameter of capillary tube, enter viscosity of fluid ( μ), Discharge (Q), Length (l), Density (ρ) and difference in pressure head (h) and hit the calculate button. Here is how the Diameter of capillary tube calculation can be explained with given input values -> 0.334381 = ((10*128*1*3)/(pi*997*[g]*10))^(1/4).

FAQ

What is Diameter of capillary tube?
The Diameter of capillary tube formula is known while considering the density of oil or fluid, difference in pressure head for a length 'L', the viscosity of fluid or oil, and the discharge. and is represented as d=(( μ*128*Q*l)/(pi*ρ*[g]*h))^(1/4) or Diameter =((viscosity of fluid*128*Discharge*Length)/(pi*Density*[g]*difference in pressure head))^(1/4). The viscosity of fluid is a measure of its resistance to deformation at a given rate, Discharge is the rate of flow of a liquid, Length is the measurement or extent of something from end to end, The density of a material shows the denseness of that material in a specific given area. This is taken as mass per unit volume of a given object. and The difference in pressure head is considered in the practical application of Bernoulli's equation.
How to calculate Diameter of capillary tube?
The Diameter of capillary tube formula is known while considering the density of oil or fluid, difference in pressure head for a length 'L', the viscosity of fluid or oil, and the discharge. is calculated using Diameter =((viscosity of fluid*128*Discharge*Length)/(pi*Density*[g]*difference in pressure head))^(1/4). To calculate Diameter of capillary tube, you need viscosity of fluid ( μ), Discharge (Q), Length (l), Density (ρ) and difference in pressure head (h). With our tool, you need to enter the respective value for viscosity of fluid, Discharge, Length, Density and difference in pressure head and hit the calculate button. You can also select the units (if any) for Input(s) and the Output as well.
How many ways are there to calculate Diameter ?
In this formula, Diameter uses viscosity of fluid, Discharge, Length, Density and difference in pressure head. We can use 11 other way(s) to calculate the same, which is/are as follows -
  • Diameter =Circumference of Circle/pi
  • Diameter =2*sqrt(Area of Circle/pi)
  • Diameter =2*Radius
  • Diameter =Radius of cone
  • Diameter =6*(Thickness)^1/2
  • Diameter =sqrt((Cross sectional area*4)/pi)
  • Diameter =2*Radius
  • Diameter =(Maximum permissible eccentricity-0.14*Overall depth of column)/(0.43*Area ratio of cross sectional area to gross area*Force ratio of strengths of reinforcements)
  • Diameter =moment/(0.12*Total area*Yield strength of reinforcing steel)
  • Diameter =(2*x coordinate of focus of parabola)/Slope of Line
  • Diameter =33.33*Allowable Bearing Stresses on Pins/(yield strength of steel-13)
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