Rudrani Tidke
Cummins College of Engineering for Women (CCEW), Pune
Rudrani Tidke has created this Calculator and 10+ more calculators!
Mona Gladys
St Joseph's College (St Joseph's College), Bengaluru
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11 Other formulas that you can solve using the same Inputs

Distance from center to a light source for destructive interference in YDSE
Distance from center to the light source=((2*Number-1)*Wavelength*Distance between slits and screen)/(2*Distance between two coherent sources) GO
Distance from center to a light source for constructive interference in YDSE
Distance from center to the light source=(Number*Wavelength*Distance between slits and screen)/Distance between two coherent sources GO
Fringe Width
Fringe Width=(Wavelength*Distance between slits and screen)/Distance between two coherent sources GO
Optical path difference when fringe width is given
Optical path difference=(Refractive Index-1)*Thickness*Fringe Width/Wavelength GO
Distance from center to a light source for destructive interference in YDSE
Distance from center to the light source=(2*Number+1)*Wavelength/2 GO
Phase Difference
Phase Difference=(2*pi*Path Difference)/Wavelength GO
Thin-film destructive interference in reflected light
Destructive Interference=Number*Wavelength GO
Path difference for minima in Young’s double-slit experiment
Path Difference=(2*Number-1)*Wavelength/2 GO
Path difference for minima in Young’s double-slit experiment
Path Difference=(2*Number+1)*Wavelength/2 GO
Path difference of two progressive wave
Path Difference=(2*pi)/Wavelength GO
Path difference in YDSE when λ is given
Path Difference=Number*Wavelength GO

Stopping Potential Formula

Stopping Potential=([hP]*[c]/[Charge-e])*(1/Wavelength)-(Work function of the surface of the metal/[Charge-e])
More formulas
Photon’s Momentum when Wavelength is Given GO
Photon’s Momentum when Energy is Given GO
Energy in nth Bohr’s Orbit GO
Quantization of the Angular Momentum GO
Moseley’s Law GO
Beta Parameter Of A Transistor Using Base Current GO
Alpha Parameter Of A Transistor Using Beta GO
collector current Of A Transistor Using alpha GO
Collector current Of A Transistor Using Beta GO
emitter current Of A Transistor Using alpha GO
Base current Of A Transistor Using Beta GO

What is stopping potential in photoelectric effect?

The stopping voltage (or stopping potential) refers to the voltage difference required to stop electrons from moving between plates and creating a current in the photoelectric experiment. Recall that in the photoelectric experiment, light is directed onto a metal plate and if the frequency of light is high enough, electrons are ejected from the surface. These electrons then travel to a second metal plate found directly across. The minimum amount of energy that is required to eject an electron from the metal surface is known as the work function. The maximum kinetic energy that the ejected electron has is given by subtracting the work function from the energy found in one photon of light. The stopping voltage is readily used to determine the kinetic energy that the electrons have as they are ejected from the metal plate. The product of the charge on an electron and the stopping voltage gives us the maximum kinetic energy of that ejected electron.

How to Calculate Stopping Potential?

Stopping Potential calculator uses Stopping Potential=([hP]*[c]/[Charge-e])*(1/Wavelength)-(Work function of the surface of the metal/[Charge-e]) to calculate the Stopping Potential, The Stopping Potential formula is defined as the required potential for stopping the removal of an electron from a metal surface when the incident light energy is greater than the work potential of the metal on which the incident light is focused. Stopping Potential also known as cut-off-potential. Stopping Potential and is denoted by V0 symbol.

How to calculate Stopping Potential using this online calculator? To use this online calculator for Stopping Potential, enter Wavelength (λ) and Work function of the surface of the metal (phi) and hit the calculate button. Here is how the Stopping Potential calculation can be explained with given input values -> -6.242E+18 = ([hP]*[c]/[Charge-e])*(1/2)-(1/[Charge-e]).

FAQ

What is Stopping Potential?
The Stopping Potential formula is defined as the required potential for stopping the removal of an electron from a metal surface when the incident light energy is greater than the work potential of the metal on which the incident light is focused. Stopping Potential also known as cut-off-potential and is represented as V0=([hP]*[c]/[Charge-e])*(1/λ)-(phi/[Charge-e]) or Stopping Potential=([hP]*[c]/[Charge-e])*(1/Wavelength)-(Work function of the surface of the metal/[Charge-e]). Wavelength is the distance between identical points (adjacent crests) in the adjacent cycles of a waveform signal propagated in space or along a wire and Work function of the surface of the metal is nothing but the binding energy of electron of the electron to the particular material.
How to calculate Stopping Potential?
The Stopping Potential formula is defined as the required potential for stopping the removal of an electron from a metal surface when the incident light energy is greater than the work potential of the metal on which the incident light is focused. Stopping Potential also known as cut-off-potential is calculated using Stopping Potential=([hP]*[c]/[Charge-e])*(1/Wavelength)-(Work function of the surface of the metal/[Charge-e]). To calculate Stopping Potential, you need Wavelength (λ) and Work function of the surface of the metal (phi). With our tool, you need to enter the respective value for Wavelength and Work function of the surface of the metal and hit the calculate button. You can also select the units (if any) for Input(s) and the Output as well.
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