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Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given Solution

STEP 0: Pre-Calculation Summary
Formula Used
diameter_of_pipe = (Extreme fibre stress+(Load per unit length)/(2*Thickness of pipe))*((8*Thickness of pipe^2)/(3*Load per unit length))
D = (S+(w)/(2*t))*((8*t^2)/(3*w))
This formula uses 3 Variables
Variables Used
Extreme fibre stress - Extreme fibre stress at the end of horizontal diameter. (Measured in Newton per Square Meter)
Load per unit length- Load per unit length is the distributed load which is spread over a surface or line.
Thickness of pipe - Thickness of pipe is the smaller dimention of pipe . (Measured in Meter)
STEP 1: Convert Input(s) to Base Unit
Extreme fibre stress: 2 Newton per Square Meter --> 2 Pascal (Check conversion here)
Load per unit length: 3 --> No Conversion Required
Thickness of pipe: 3 Meter --> 3 Meter No Conversion Required
STEP 2: Evaluate Formula
Substituting Input Values in Formula
D = (S+(w)/(2*t))*((8*t^2)/(3*w)) --> (2+(3)/(2*3))*((8*3^2)/(3*3))
Evaluating ... ...
D = 20
STEP 3: Convert Result to Output's Unit
20 Meter -->2000 Centimeter (Check conversion here)
FINAL ANSWER
2000 Centimeter <-- Diameter of Pipe
(Calculation completed in 00.031 seconds)

11 Other formulas that you can solve using the same Inputs

Moment of Inertia of shaft in terms of circular frequency
moment_inertia_shaft = ((Natural circular frequency^2)*Load per unit length*(Length of Shaft^4))/((pi^4)*Young's Modulus*Acceleration Due To Gravity) Go
Moment of Inertia of shaft in terms of natural frequency
moment_inertia_shaft = ((4*frequency^2)*Load per unit length*(Length of Shaft^4))/((pi^2)*Young's Modulus*Acceleration Due To Gravity) Go
Length of the shaft in terms of static deflection
length_of_shaft = ((Static deflection*384*Young's Modulus*Moment of inertia of the shaft)/(5*Load per unit length))^(1/4) Go
Static deflection for simply supported beam with uniformly distributed load
static_deflection = (5*Load per unit length*(Length of the Beam^4))/(384*Young's Modulus*Moment of inertia of the beam) Go
Length of beam for Simply supported beam with a uniformly distributed load
length_of_beam = ((384*Young's Modulus*Moment of inertia of the beam*Static deflection)/(5*Load per unit length))^(1/4) Go
Static deflection of a simply supported shaft due to uniformly distributed load
static_deflection = (5*Load per unit length*(Length of Shaft^4))/(384*Young's Modulus*Moment of inertia of the shaft) Go
Static deflection for fixed beam with a uniformly distributed point load
static_deflection = (Load per unit length*(Length of the Beam^4))/(384*Young's Modulus*Moment of inertia of the beam) Go
Length of beam for fixed beam with a uniformly distributed load
length_of_beam = ((384*Young's Modulus*Moment of inertia of the beam*Static deflection)/(Load per unit length))^(1/4) Go
Static deflection for cantilever beam with a uniformly distributed load
static_deflection = (Load per unit length*(Length of the Beam^4))/(8*Young's Modulus*Moment of inertia of the beam) Go
Length of beam for cantilever beam with a uniformly distributed load
length_of_beam = ((8*Young's Modulus*Moment of inertia of the beam*Static deflection)/(Load per unit length))^(1/4) Go
Moment of Inertia of shaft in terms of static deflection if load per unit length is known
moment_inertia_shaft = (5*Load per unit length*(Length of Shaft^4))/(384*Young's Modulus*Static deflection) Go

11 Other formulas that calculate the same Output

Diameter of pipe for loss of pressure head in viscous flow
diameter_of_pipe = sqrt((32*viscosity of fluid*Velocity*Length)/(Density*[g]*loss of peizometric head)) Go
Diameter of Pipe when Head Loss over the Length of Pipe with Discharge is Given
diameter_of_pipe = ((128*Dynamic viscosity*Discharge*Length of Pipe)/(pi*specific weight of liquid*Head loss))^(1/4) Go
Diameter of Pipe When Head Loss due to Laminar Flow is Given
diameter_of_pipe = ((128*Viscous Force*Rate of flow*Length of Pipe)/(specific weight of liquid*pi*Head loss))^(1/4) Go
Diameter of Pipe when Head Loss over the Length of Pipe is Given
diameter_of_pipe = sqrt((32*Dynamic viscosity*Mean velocity*Length of Pipe)/(specific weight of liquid*Head loss)) Go
Diameter of the equivalent pipe
diameter_of_pipe = ((4*16*(Discharge^2)*Coefficient of Friction*Length of Pipe)/((pi^2)*2*loss of head*[g]))^(1/5) Go
Diameter of Pipe when Head Loss due to Frictional Resistance is Given
diameter_of_pipe = Darcy friction factor*Length of Pipe*(Mean velocity^2)/(2*[g]*head loss due to friction) Go
Diameter of pipe for difference in pressure in viscous flow
diameter_of_pipe = sqrt((32*viscosity of oil*Average Velocity*Length)/(difference in pressure viscous flow)) Go
Diameter of pipe for head loss due to friction in viscous flow
diameter_of_pipe = (4*Coefficient of Friction*Length of Pipe*(Average Velocity^2))/(loss of head*2*[g]) Go
Diameter of Pipe when Pressure Drop over the Length of Pipe with Discharge is Given
diameter_of_pipe = ((128*Dynamic viscosity*Discharge*Length of Pipe)/Pressure Difference*pi)^(1/4) Go
Diameter of Pipe when Pressure Drop over the Length of Pipe is Given
diameter_of_pipe = sqrt((32*Dynamic viscosity*Mean velocity*Length of Pipe)/Pressure Difference) Go
Diameter of Pipe when Friction Factor is Given
diameter_of_pipe = (64*Dynamic viscosity)/(Darcy friction factor*Mean velocity*density of fluid) Go

Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given Formula

diameter_of_pipe = (Extreme fibre stress+(Load per unit length)/(2*Thickness of pipe))*((8*Thickness of pipe^2)/(3*Load per unit length))
D = (S+(w)/(2*t))*((8*t^2)/(3*w))

What is tensile stress ?

Tensile stress can be defined as the magnitude of force applied along an elastic rod, which is divided by the cross-sectional area of the rod in a direction perpendicular to the applied force. Tensile means the material is under tension and that there are forces acting on it trying to stretch the material.

How to Calculate Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given?

Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given calculator uses diameter_of_pipe = (Extreme fibre stress+(Load per unit length)/(2*Thickness of pipe))*((8*Thickness of pipe^2)/(3*Load per unit length)) to calculate the Diameter of Pipe, The Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given calculates the value of diameter of pipe when we have prior information of other parameters used. Diameter of Pipe and is denoted by D symbol.

How to calculate Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given using this online calculator? To use this online calculator for Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given, enter Extreme fibre stress (S), Load per unit length (w) and Thickness of pipe (t) and hit the calculate button. Here is how the Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given calculation can be explained with given input values -> 2000 = (2+(3)/(2*3))*((8*3^2)/(3*3)).

FAQ

What is Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given?
The Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given calculates the value of diameter of pipe when we have prior information of other parameters used and is represented as D = (S+(w)/(2*t))*((8*t^2)/(3*w)) or diameter_of_pipe = (Extreme fibre stress+(Load per unit length)/(2*Thickness of pipe))*((8*Thickness of pipe^2)/(3*Load per unit length)). Extreme fibre stress at the end of horizontal diameter, Load per unit length is the distributed load which is spread over a surface or line and Thickness of pipe is the smaller dimention of pipe .
How to calculate Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given?
The Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given calculates the value of diameter of pipe when we have prior information of other parameters used is calculated using diameter_of_pipe = (Extreme fibre stress+(Load per unit length)/(2*Thickness of pipe))*((8*Thickness of pipe^2)/(3*Load per unit length)). To calculate Diameter of Pipe when Tensile End Fibre Stress is Given, you need Extreme fibre stress (S), Load per unit length (w) and Thickness of pipe (t). With our tool, you need to enter the respective value for Extreme fibre stress, Load per unit length and Thickness of pipe and hit the calculate button. You can also select the units (if any) for Input(s) and the Output as well.
How many ways are there to calculate Diameter of Pipe?
In this formula, Diameter of Pipe uses Extreme fibre stress, Load per unit length and Thickness of pipe. We can use 11 other way(s) to calculate the same, which is/are as follows -
  • diameter_of_pipe = ((128*Viscous Force*Rate of flow*Length of Pipe)/(specific weight of liquid*pi*Head loss))^(1/4)
  • diameter_of_pipe = sqrt((32*viscosity of oil*Average Velocity*Length)/(difference in pressure viscous flow))
  • diameter_of_pipe = sqrt((32*viscosity of fluid*Velocity*Length)/(Density*[g]*loss of peizometric head))
  • diameter_of_pipe = (4*Coefficient of Friction*Length of Pipe*(Average Velocity^2))/(loss of head*2*[g])
  • diameter_of_pipe = ((4*16*(Discharge^2)*Coefficient of Friction*Length of Pipe)/((pi^2)*2*loss of head*[g]))^(1/5)
  • diameter_of_pipe = sqrt((32*Dynamic viscosity*Mean velocity*Length of Pipe)/Pressure Difference)
  • diameter_of_pipe = ((128*Dynamic viscosity*Discharge*Length of Pipe)/Pressure Difference*pi)^(1/4)
  • diameter_of_pipe = sqrt((32*Dynamic viscosity*Mean velocity*Length of Pipe)/(specific weight of liquid*Head loss))
  • diameter_of_pipe = ((128*Dynamic viscosity*Discharge*Length of Pipe)/(pi*specific weight of liquid*Head loss))^(1/4)
  • diameter_of_pipe = Darcy friction factor*Length of Pipe*(Mean velocity^2)/(2*[g]*head loss due to friction)
  • diameter_of_pipe = (64*Dynamic viscosity)/(Darcy friction factor*Mean velocity*density of fluid)
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