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Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time Solution

STEP 0: Pre-Calculation Summary
Formula Used
no_of_abrasive_particles_impacting = Material removal rate/(Empirical constant*Mean diameter of abrasive particles^3*Velocity^(3/2)*(Density/(12*Brinell Hardness))^(3/4))
N = Zw/(A0*d^3*v^(3/2)*(ρ/(12*HB))^(3/4))
This formula uses 6 Variables
Variables Used
Material removal rate - Material removal rate (MRR) is the amount of material removed per time unit (usually per minute) when performing machining operations such as using a lathe or milling machine. (Measured in Meter³ per Second)
Empirical constant- The Empirical constant is a self determined constant whose value is accessible from table of such constants. This constant is used to calculate the intrinsic carrier concentration.
Mean diameter of abrasive particles - Mean diameter of abrasive particles is the mean calculated from sampling method. (Measured in Millimeter)
Velocity - Velocity, in physics, is a vector quantity (it has both magnitude and direction), and is the time rate of change of position (of an object). (Measured in Meter per Second)
Density - The density of a material shows the denseness of that material in a specific given area. This is taken as mass per unit volume of a given object. (Measured in Kilogram per Meter³)
Brinell Hardness - Brinell Hardness uses a hard, spherical indenter which is forced into the surface of the metal to be tested. (Measured in Kilogram-Force per Square Millimeter)
STEP 1: Convert Input(s) to Base Unit
Material removal rate: 1 Meter³ per Second --> 1 Meter³ per Second No Conversion Required
Empirical constant: 100 --> No Conversion Required
Mean diameter of abrasive particles: 1 Millimeter --> 0.001 Meter (Check conversion here)
Velocity: 60 Meter per Second --> 60 Meter per Second No Conversion Required
Density: 997 Kilogram per Meter³ --> 997 Kilogram per Meter³ No Conversion Required
Brinell Hardness: 200 Kilogram-Force per Square Millimeter --> 1961329999.99986 Pascal (Check conversion here)
STEP 2: Evaluate Formula
Substituting Input Values in Formula
N = Zw/(A0*d^3*v^(3/2)*(ρ/(12*HB))^(3/4)) --> 1/(100*0.001^3*60^(3/2)*(997/(12*1961329999.99986))^(3/4))
Evaluating ... ...
N = 7287032284.97284
STEP 3: Convert Result to Output's Unit
7287032284.97284 --> No Conversion Required
FINAL ANSWER
7287032284.97284 <-- No. of abrasive particles impacting per unit time
(Calculation completed in 00.031 seconds)

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Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time Formula

no_of_abrasive_particles_impacting = Material removal rate/(Empirical constant*Mean diameter of abrasive particles^3*Velocity^(3/2)*(Density/(12*Brinell Hardness))^(3/4))
N = Zw/(A0*d^3*v^(3/2)*(ρ/(12*HB))^(3/4))

What is Abrasive Jet Machining ?

Abrasive Jet Machining is a process that uses a very high speed (supersonic about 2.5 Mach number) water jet mixed with abrasives to cut any type of material without, in any way, affecting the work material or the environment. The AJM machines aim a highly focused, supersonic stream of water at the material such that it can cut composites smoothly by eroding them without generating any heat. Thus the AJM process eliminates all the thermal and mechanical distortion caused by conventional cutting methods. Also the water jet nozzle can be directed at any angle to the material thereby allowing for angled cuts. For cutting soft materials such as textiles and food stuffs, pure water without any abrasives is used.

How to Calculate Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time?

Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time calculator uses no_of_abrasive_particles_impacting = Material removal rate/(Empirical constant*Mean diameter of abrasive particles^3*Velocity^(3/2)*(Density/(12*Brinell Hardness))^(3/4)) to calculate the No. of abrasive particles impacting per unit time, The Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time formula is defined as the average no. of particles impacting work surface to cut it during AJM. No. of abrasive particles impacting per unit time and is denoted by N symbol.

How to calculate Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time using this online calculator? To use this online calculator for Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time, enter Material removal rate (Zw), Empirical constant (A0), Mean diameter of abrasive particles (d), Velocity (v), Density (ρ) and Brinell Hardness (HB) and hit the calculate button. Here is how the Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time calculation can be explained with given input values -> 7.287E+9 = 1/(100*0.001^3*60^(3/2)*(997/(12*1961329999.99986))^(3/4)).

FAQ

What is Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time?
The Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time formula is defined as the average no. of particles impacting work surface to cut it during AJM and is represented as N = Zw/(A0*d^3*v^(3/2)*(ρ/(12*HB))^(3/4)) or no_of_abrasive_particles_impacting = Material removal rate/(Empirical constant*Mean diameter of abrasive particles^3*Velocity^(3/2)*(Density/(12*Brinell Hardness))^(3/4)). Material removal rate (MRR) is the amount of material removed per time unit (usually per minute) when performing machining operations such as using a lathe or milling machine, The Empirical constant is a self determined constant whose value is accessible from table of such constants. This constant is used to calculate the intrinsic carrier concentration, Mean diameter of abrasive particles is the mean calculated from sampling method, Velocity, in physics, is a vector quantity (it has both magnitude and direction), and is the time rate of change of position (of an object). , The density of a material shows the denseness of that material in a specific given area. This is taken as mass per unit volume of a given object. and Brinell Hardness uses a hard, spherical indenter which is forced into the surface of the metal to be tested.
How to calculate Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time?
The Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time formula is defined as the average no. of particles impacting work surface to cut it during AJM is calculated using no_of_abrasive_particles_impacting = Material removal rate/(Empirical constant*Mean diameter of abrasive particles^3*Velocity^(3/2)*(Density/(12*Brinell Hardness))^(3/4)). To calculate Number of abrasive particles impacting per unit time, you need Material removal rate (Zw), Empirical constant (A0), Mean diameter of abrasive particles (d), Velocity (v), Density (ρ) and Brinell Hardness (HB). With our tool, you need to enter the respective value for Material removal rate, Empirical constant, Mean diameter of abrasive particles, Velocity, Density and Brinell Hardness and hit the calculate button. You can also select the units (if any) for Input(s) and the Output as well.
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